Is GDPR good or bad for your online business? [plus our new GDPR-compliant Policies] | LearnWorlds Blog

Believe me; we know a thing or two about GDPR fatigue…

And we know that you’ve probably received too many GDPR-related emails in the past few weeks and that you want to scream (or worse) every time you see a new one. Wanna see the crappiest GDPR emails of them all? Then check out the GDPR Hall of Shame.

By the way, did you know that most of them were probably for nothing, or illegal to begin with?

But how does GDPR affect you, as an online entrepreneur, today?

Here are the crucial things you need to know:

It’s only natural if you find it annoying. People don’t like change. And it’s true that in the short term you will have to change your routines and rethink some of your practices when it comes to which data you collect and how you use them.

And that’s precisely the point of GDPR! Common sense and some best practices will go a long way in becoming compliant.

GDPR is now a fact of life, and it’s here to stay. If you can’t fight them, join them. But don’t just do that grudgingly. Instead, embrace it and make it part of your ethical business manifesto.

Trust is the true currency of online business. And GDPR, although a bit clunky and scary for entrepreneurs, has been designed to increase trust in doing business online. Customers in Europe are embracing it, and the world will follow suit.

And that’s an opportunity for your business too.

Invest the time to become GDPR compliant and inform your students about how you value and protect their data. Users trust you with their data, and the least you got to do is to show that you take that very seriously. No more mindless data-hoarding. We all need to be more mindful and strategic about how and why we collect data and how this makes our product better.

We’ll be here to help so let’s do this together, and everything will be OK.

New, GDPR-compliant Privacy Policy and Terms of Service

LearnWorlds is an EU company, so we’ve been following and implementing the relevant European and UK legislation since day 1. In light of GDPR, we have updated our Policies to make them more transparent and explicit.

We want to make it as easy as possible for you to understand how we collect data, how we use it, and what are your user rights under GDPR. In any case, our objective is to be compliant with the GDPR, not only in form but substance.

We share with you today our updated, GDPR-compliant policies:

We also now have available a Data Processing Addendum (DPA) for those of you who may require it. If your business requires such an Addendum then simply send us an email to gdpr@learnworlds.com

Becoming GDPR compliant as a business was the easiest part. What is far more complex is making the LearnWorlds platform – on which thousands of course sellers depend to run their online businesses – GDPR compliant. And we are talking about businesses that use dozens of different business models as well as dozens of integrations with other software to process their data and do their marketing.

There’s some final work to be done here, to make sure that our solutions will help and not disrupt your business. Over the next few weeks, we will be gradually releasing all those improvements and provide you with guides about how GDPR will affect your course marketing

And remember, becoming GDPR-compliant is not a one-off but more like a Marathon. Enforcement agencies in the EU are only now delving into some of the practicalities and as they do, interpretations of GDPR and best practices will evolve, as will the expectations of privacy-sensitive consumers. We will keep working on this to help you become and stay compliant.

Thanks,

Panos and The LearnWorlds Team

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Panos Siozos
CEO and Co-Founder at

Panos Siozos is the CEO and Co-Founder of LearnWorlds. He holds a PhD in Educational Technology and has worked extensively as a computer science educator, software engineer, IT manager and researcher in many EU funded research projects. Before following the startup route, he was working in the European Parliament as a policy adviser for research and innovation.

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